Knish Me Once, Knish Me Twice

Knish me once,
And Knish me twice,
And Knish me once again,
It’s been a long, long time.

Apologies to the great songwriter, Jule Styne. He would understand. He was a New Yorker.

Allow me to tell you a story. I was recently reading Julie Andrews’ early-years bio, and came across a mention of Ms. Andrews’ fond childhood memories of potato sandwiches. What?!

Must be an English thing. That was enough for me. Being as I love anything English, I love Ms. Andrews, and I love potatoes, I jumped on the bandwagon. I found a recipe easily enough, but decided to adapt it a bit. Nothing major in the changes department, but I have to admit, I did adapt. Italian Parsley subbing for corriander (because we grow parsley), the microwave subbing for a boiling pot, added a tiny bit of sour cream.

  1. Microwave (bake) a potato. Or boil one.
  2. Cook up a little onion in a pan with some butter.
  3. Mash up the cooked potato, onion, and some parsley together.
  4. Add a little sour cream to smooth it out, mix/mash it up.
  5. Salt to taste.
  6. Spread it on a piece of bread.
  7. Grill the thing with butter (like a grilled cheese).
  8. Or grill it in one of those sandwich-maker things.
  9. Serve with ketchup.

It didn’t even occur to me while I was making it, but – You know what I unwittingly nailed the recipe for? What this thing tasted exactly like? A New York City knish. Those Yiddish-origin potato treats you can buy from the street vendors in the city. They were always a favorite of mine. Serendipity! I learned about a delicious English treat, and I rediscovered a favorite New York City street food.

English, Yiddish … When it comes to our potatoes, we’re not all that very different, are we?

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10 Comments

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10 responses to “Knish Me Once, Knish Me Twice

  1. hideawayhill

    Mmmm…..it’s been along time since I’ve had one. My grandmother used to make them as a side dish served with applesauce. Good memory! Thanks for the recipe….I’m saving it and will try it!

  2. ADKtricollie

    Ahh Kinishes absolutely love them. We have a seasonal knoshery in town here that carries potato knishes from Brooklyn and Pastrami from the Carnegie Deli in the city. I sometimes buy them cold and have them for dinner. Knishes was a lunchtime staple of mine when I worked in the big city. Now if only I could get my hands on some good Jewish Rye and Matzah Ball Soup and oh let’s not forget a good kosher pickle…In any case, I am a potato junkie and will try this recipe. Sounds delicious! Jeez what’s not to love about the “potato!!” I have had a love affair with Mr. Potato probably since the day I was born.

  3. TriCollie – One of my great city sadnesses is that Ratner’s (kosher “dairy” restaurant) on Houston closed years ago!

  4. ADKtricollie

    I have been to several famous & not so famous Jewish Restaurants in the city but never made it to Ratner’s. A landmark not to be foregotten. I’ll toast a Dr. Brown to that!

  5. ADKtricollie

    Well I am commenting way too much on your blog today, but you put me in the mood for a knish, so I stopped in town this afternoon and bought 6 cold potato knishes. Not sure how long they will last! Time to turn the toaster oven on…

  6. You know, I never thought to check to see if the grocery store had them. I bet Price Chopper does!

  7. Pamela

    Seriously, potato sandwiches? Why mess around like that when what you really need is a chip butty. AKA French fries in (preferably) white bread. The best tasting Chip Butty is made with chips from the Chippy (Fish and Chip Shop) and if you can manage to be beside the seaside too then all the better. And seasoning, salt and, if you like it, malt vinegar.

  8. Ooooh! Knishes! I used to eat these for lunch in NYC all the time as a young office worker. They were great! I may want to try this recipe!

  9. themac

    And to think I thought I planned too many potatoes this year!!

  10. What have I missed? POTATO sandwiches? Isn’t that like bread on bread? How strange. And knishes, i have never heard of them. rural life does limit exposure.

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